Covid recovery

This is from someone sharing his close call to death! Good read:

I’ve kept this quiet, but after reading the condemnation and censorship of the “frontline doctors,” I thought I would share my story. Fb FCC

I contracted Covid and had the battle of my life for three weeks. Fever, chills, uncontrollable coughing, muscle aches and a migraine that literally lasted 10 days. Those symptoms were akin to a severe flu, but double pneumonia was definitely a different beast.

My lungs filled with fluid. I could not lay down, could barely walk across the room, and several times thought I wouldn’t catch my next breath.

I was taken to the ER. They confirmed double pneumonia, tested me, and said I could be put on a vent or go home. Seriously. No other option. I’ve read too many stories of people not getting off vents so I went home in hopes I would get better on my own. I didn’t. My lungs only got worse.

One night around 10:30, Megan received a call from the daughter of a Dallas doctor and said her dad had a 100% success rate with Covid patients. Her dad, Dr. Cesar Gomez, prescribed a treatment he said multiple doctors were using with high success.

He called in a prescription of hydroxychloroquine, Zithromax, Zinc, a nebulizer with Budesonide, along with Vitamins A and D.

When I woke the next morning I was already beginning to feel a tad better. By the next day I knew I was going to be ok. My lungs were improving and the migraine was gone. Within 48 hours I was walking and breathing much better. It worked and possibly saved my life.

Yesterday I saw the same media who say we should stay in, close businesses, wear masks, all to protect the most vulnerable…come out and attempt to shame and debunk a group of doctors who say they can help. I wear a mask, I social distance, but I almost died from a virus without a vaccine. A treatment saved me, yet the first action by half of our country was not to listen with hope, but to say one of the doctors had weird beliefs, therefore, we shouldn’t listen. The doctors couldn’t be right, especially since Trump mentioned a similar treatment in March.

I am not a Trump fan, not a Biden fan. At all. I think they both act like children. But, the lives of thousands should have NOTHING to do with which way you vote. Nothing. I don’t know the doctors in that vid, few of us do, but if there is help we should rationally consider it.

Covid has become a political conversation. Period. We may not want to admit it, but it has. If Trump says it, it’s wrong. If Trump says it, it’s right. And, that is a terrible mark on our maturity, intelligence and love for others.

Let’s be bigger than politicians who are attempting to be puppet masters in lieu of a November election. If a treatment works, we should shout it to the rooftops, no matter which way we vote.

Does it work for everyone? I don’t know. Are there side effects? Maybe, but I figured any side effect was better than dying. (The only side effect I can pinpoint was light sensitivity for about a week.) Bottomline, I was told there was no treatment option and I feel very blessed to have found one that worked. Why fight that if you/me/we truly care about others?

My thought? Let doctors make medical decisions and keep politicians where they belong. Let doctors do what they are trained to do, and let media be talking heads.

Stop trying to “debunk” everything that doesn’t agree with your political narrative. Please. Let’s be good and better humans.

If you know someone with Covid have them speak to their PCP. Get a second opinion, if needed. I wouldn’t recommend any regimen unless under the care of a physician. And, if you’re in the Dallas area, feel free to call Dr. Gomez’s office. There are doctors willing to help. Find one that will.

*copied from a friend

Isaiah 28:20

March 28, ’20 (follow on to Isaiah 26:20 observation)

Isa 28:17 Judgment also will I lay to the line, and righteousness to the plummet: and the hail shall sweep away the refuge of lies, and the waters shall overflow the hiding place.
Isa 28:18 And your covenant with death shall be disannulled, and your agreement with hell shall not stand; when the overflowing scourge shall pass through, then ye shall be trodden down by it.
Isa 28:19 From the time that it goeth forth it shall take you: for morning by morning shall it pass over, by day and by night: and it shall be a vexation only to understand the report.
Isa 28:20 For the bed is shorter than that a man can stretch himself on it: and the covering narrower than that he can wrap himself in it.
Isa 28:21 For the LORD shall rise up as in mount Perazim, he shall be wroth as in the valley of Gibeon, that he may do his work, his strange work; and bring to pass his act, his strange act.
Isa 28:22 Now therefore be ye not mockers, lest your bands be made strong: for I have heard from the Lord GOD of hosts a consumption, even determined upon the whole earth.

Those lying refuges to which you trust, the leftists, will not be able to give you that protection which you expect from them, no more than a person can stretch himself out on a bed that is far too short. Pelosi and the other assorted leftists in political power only care about enriching themselves not protecting the people.

“His strange work” the work of binging destruction which is contrary to His own benignity of His own nature and the usual way of dealing with people. Open your eyes, an alignment is taking place. Now is the time to be “right.”

Ecc 10:2 A wise man’s heart leans to the right; but a fool’s to the left.

Image may contain: one or more people

To You Who Bring Small Children to Church
There you are sitting in worship or Bible study. Your child, or toddler, is restless. Perhaps they’re even a little boisterous. You try to silence them, and nothing. You try to pacify them with food or toys, and nothing. Eventually, you resort to the last thing you wanted to do: you pick them up, and before a watching audience, you make the march out of the auditorium. All the while, you’re a little embarrassed. Maybe you’re a little frustrated too. You might even think to yourself, “There’s no point in coming to church. I get nothing out of it because I have to constantly care for my kid.”
I want you — you mothers and/or fathers — to know just how encouraging you are to so many. The little elderly woman who often fills alone beams with a smile at the sight of you wrestling with your little one. She’s been there before. She knows how hard it can be, but she smiles because to hear that brings back precious memories. To see young parents and their small children brighten her day, and she may have just received bad news this week about her health, but seeing the vitality of young ones removes — if but for a moment — her fears.
The older man who always seems to be grouchy notices you too. He’s always talking about how children in this day have no respect or sense of good. But, he sees you — a young family — in church, and you don’t miss any gathering. Like clockwork, he can depend on the sight of you and your young family. You give him hope that maybe the church isn’t doomed after all, because there are still young parents who love God enough to bring their restless children to worship.
Bring your children to church. If you don’t hear crying, the church is dying. As hard as it might be for you as a parent who’s half-asleep, keep on doing what you’re doing. You are an encouragement, and you’re starting off your children’s lives as you should. – Author Unknown

 

When I was a small child like the one pictured above, age 3 or 4, I was singing loudly, off-key and wrong tune.  My mother was so embarrassed and tried to silence me and tried to remove me from the church service but was stopped.  “No, no,” they told her “He’s fine, it is okay; don’t be embarrassed.”  Another person prophesied, “He will grow up and be a preacher.”

<pastorwardclinton.com>

Get Used To It?

A gardener took great pride in caring for his lawn.  But one year it grew full of dandelions.  He tried every method and product to get rid of them, but nothing worked.  Exasperated, he wrote the Department of Agriculture explaining all that he had done.  “What shall I try next?”  he wrote.  “Try getting used to the,” came the reply.

Too many Churches & Church people seem to have done that with sin but Jesus The Christ has not given permission for His followers to do that.

pastorwardclinton.com

Home Plate Life Lesson

No automatic alt text available.

Worth the read… For everyone especially parents and coaches
In Nashville, Tennessee, during the first week of January, 1996, more than 4,000 baseball coaches descended upon the Opryland Hotel for the 52nd annual ABCA convention.

While I waited in line to register with the hotel staff, I heard other more veteran coaches rumbling about the lineup of speakers scheduled to present during the weekend. One name, in particular, kept resurfacing, always with the same sentiment — “John Scolinos is here? Oh man, worth every penny of my airfare.”

Who the heck is John Scolinos, I wondered. Well, in 1996 Coach Scolinos was 78 years old and five years retired from a college coaching career that began in 1948. No matter, I was just happy to be there.

He shuffled to the stage to an impressive standing ovation, wearing dark polyester pants, a light blue shirt, and a string around his neck from which home plate hung — a full-sized, stark-white home plate. Pointed side down.

Seriously, I wondered, who in the hell is this guy?

After speaking for twenty-five minutes, not once mentioning the prop hanging around his neck, Coach Scolinos appeared to notice the snickering among some of the coaches. Even those who knew Coach Scolinos had to wonder exactly where he was going with this, or if he had simply forgotten about home plate since he’d gotten on stage.

Then, finally …

“You’re probably all wondering why I’m wearing home plate around my neck. Or maybe you think I escaped from Camarillo State Hospital,” he said, his voice growing irascible. I laughed along with the others, acknowledging the possibility.

“No,” he continued, “I may be old, but I’m not crazy. The reason I stand before you today is to share with you baseball people what I’ve learned in my life, what I’ve learned about home plate in my 78 years.”

Several hands went up when Scolinos asked how many Little League coaches were in the room. “Do you know how wide home plate is in Little League?” After a pause, someone offered, “Seventeen inches,” more question than answer.

“That’s right,” he said. “How about in Babe Ruth? Any Babe Ruth coaches in the house?”

Another long pause.

“Seventeen inches?”came a guess from another reluctant coach.

“That’s right,” said Scolinos. “Now, how many high school coaches do we have in the room?” Hundreds of hands shot up, as the pattern began to appear. “How wide is home plate in high school baseball?”

“Seventeen inches,” they said, sounding more confident.

“You’re right!” Scolinos barked. “And you college coaches, how wide is home plate in college?”

“Seventeen inches!” we said, in unison.

“Any Minor League coaches here? How wide is home plate in pro ball?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“RIGHT! And in the Major Leagues, how wide home plate is in the Major Leagues?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“SEV-EN-TEEN INCHES!” he confirmed, his voice bellowing off the walls.

“And what do they do with a a Big League pitcher who can’t throw the ball over these seventeen inches?” Pause. “They send him to Pocatello!” he hollered, drawing raucous laughter.

“What they don’t do is this: they don’t say, ‘Ah, that’s okay, Bobby. You can’t hit a seventeen-inch target? We’ll make it eighteen inches, or nineteen inches. We’ll make it twenty inches so you have a better chance of throwing the ball over it. If you can’t hit that, let us know so we can make it wider still, say twenty-five inches.’”

Pause.

“Coaches …”

Pause.

” … what do we do when our best player shows up late to practice? What do we do if he violates curfew? What if he uses drugs? Do we hold him accountable? Or do we change the rules to fit him? Do we widen home plate?

The chuckles gradually faded as four thousand coaches grew quiet, the fog lifting as the old coach’s message began to unfold.

Then he turned the plate toward himself and, using a Sharpie, began to draw something. When he turned it toward the crowd, point up, a house was revealed, complete with a freshly drawn door and two windows. “This is the problem in our homes today. With our marriages, with the way we parent our kids. With our discipline. We don’t teach accountability to our kids, and there is no consequence for failing to meet standards. We widen the plate!”

Pause. Then, to the point at the top of the house he added a small American flag.

“This is the problem in our schools today. The quality of our education is going downhill fast and teachers have been stripped of the tools they need to be successful….to educate and discipline our young people. We are allowing others to widen home plate! Where is that getting us?”

“And this is the problem in the Church, where powerful people in positions of authority have taken advantage of young children, only to have such an atrocity swept under the rug for years. Our church leaders are widening home plate!”

I was amazed. At a baseball convention where I expected to learn something about curveballs and bunting and how to run better practices, I had learned something far more valuable. From an old man with home plate strung around his neck, I had learned something about life, about myself, about my own weaknesses and about my responsibilities as a leader. I had to hold myself and others accountable to that which I knew to be right, lest our families, our faith, and our society continue down an undesirable path.

“If I am lucky,” Coach Scolinos concluded, “you will remember one thing from this old coach today. It is this: if we fail to hold ourselves to a higher standard, a standard of what we know to be right; if we fail to hold our spouses and our children to the same standards, if we are unwilling or unable to provide a consequence when they do not meet the standard; and if our schools and churches and our government fail to hold themselves accountable to those they serve, there is but one thing to look forward to …”

With that, he held home plate in front of his chest, turned it around, and revealed its dark black backside.

“… dark days ahead.”

Coach Scolinos died in 2009 at the age of 91, but not before touching the lives of hundreds of players and coaches, including mine. Meeting him at my first ABCA convention kept me returning year after year, looking for similar wisdom and inspiration from other coaches. He is the best clinic speaker the ABCA has ever known because he was so much more than a baseball coach.

His message was clear: “Coaches, keep your players — no matter how good they are — your own children, and most of all, keep yourself at seventeen inches.  (copied post)

pastorwardclinton.com